James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC
Author: James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC

Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry (1971)

Ok. I have to admit it. I love Dirty Harry movies. Just watched a couple of them this past weekend. And yes, they are full of depravity. Anyway, I do like to watch Inspector Callahan (Clint Eastwood) make the bad guys pay . . . carrying a bad 44 Magnum and shooting through windshields of cars to get bad guys. In one of the episodes, Harry uses a witty statement several times to a bad Lieutenant cop that that made me laugh but also grabbed my attention for a blog.  In the closing scene, when the bad cop has driven away, thinking he was the victor, only to have a bomb detonate in his car, Dirty Harry said it again with narrowed eyes, a taut brow, and breathy voice, “A man’s got to know his limitations.” I loved it!

James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC
Author: James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC

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One of the greatest blessings a counselor can receive is when a client "gets it"--that is, the truths of God's word are penetrating the heart and bringing about transformation. It is in these moments that it is clear that the Spirit is working on the heart, bringing about a new awareness of personal sin and of God's grace, translating into a more intense war for faith against the destruction of sin and for a fuller delight in God. Below is a blog that a counselee was encouraged to write, arising from her own journaling about the struggles of her own heart. These words are indicative of the sweet glories of Christ taking root in her soul. Though she has a future ahead that likely involves a degree of suffering previously unplanned, she is learning that she is deeply loved by her Savior. Enjoy and be encouraged by her simple, yet profound, words. Pray for her as she continues to struggle.

James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC
Author: James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC

Anger is something that we all struggle with—either with our own or with that of others. It is one of those emotions that cause people to feel very uncomfortable. It can evoke fear and/or anger when we are on the receiving end of someone else’s. Anger is so prevalent. It is seen universally in various forms. Anger is often soft-sold as frustration by those who want to minimize it. Sometimes it is undeniably the source torrential rage. In whatever way it is experienced, people who feel it internally can also feel alternately powerful and subsequently full of shame and regret. What is anger? Is it an emotion, an experience, or something more? What does the Bible say about anger? How does the Bible portray it? And what does it tell us we are to do about it?

James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC
Author: James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC

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One of the more common problems that people face is inter-personal conflict. Whether in marriage, in families, in the church community, or elsewhere, conflict is inevitable, given that we are all inclined toward those things which create conflict. The way we handle disagreement is perhaps the greatest indicator of our heart affections, both toward God and other people. Our intention in this discussion is that we address that part of conflict to which we can all relate—feeling wronged and wanting to retaliate.

James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC
Author: James (Steve) Clay, MABC, LPC

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Why do people seek counseling? When and why is help sought? When is it actually needed?

People seek help from counseling when they desire change in some area of their lives, or if there is some level of discomfort prompting action in the form of outside help from a counselor. Though counseling is sought by some for desired growth, more often is the case that some form of suffering has motivated a sense of urgency that is deemed as needful of outside assistance. But what is it that needs to be addressed that would make biblical counseling biblical? Or said another way, what is the aim of counseling that makes it biblical? I want to suggest that people who seek counseling that is biblical learn the reasons for which biblical counseling should exist, in order that they enter counseling relationships with those intentions in mind.